The Physical Rules

of Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Science

Exercise Physiologist Ed Watson

by Professor Edward Watson

Since 1992

  • Specialized Educational Materials
  • Seminars and Private Consulting

 

 

Nutritional Science and Human Performance Illustrated at the Cell Level

Specialized Training and Research: What’s new.

Aging clients, new tricks: on preventing cognitive decline and physical degeneration.

My latest training program Action Based Healing involves patterned movement, classical rhythmic exercises, and an integrated mind/body program designed to train the brain’s neuronal network via multi sensory oriented, whole body engagement in space with objects placed and/or moving closely in specific spatial and temporal positions – to reach out and touch, manipulate, lift, throw, move past/through, kick, etc.

Patterned movement is the foundation for motor learning and cognitive development in children, and is no different from what athletes, musicians, and aging adults must do to learn, refine, and regain spatial awareness and coordination, temporal sense, and skilled movement. Anyone at any age, in practically any condition, may engage, according to and within their limits, but playing with the limits is key to growth.

In short, parallel processing (multi sensory engagement with the world) is the key for developing the brain’s neural-synaptic web at ANY age. However, this type of positive-growth brain plasticity does not address the root causes of cellular and metabolic exhaustion exhibited as proximal symptoms, i.e. metabolic cognitive impairment, tired cells, and failure to focus on and recall one’s attentive moments.

Movement is the key player, concomitantly with rest, nutrition, and enforced breaks from the excessive combination of working/sitting/anxiety/cut-off blood flow.

That which develops early (on the front end of life, e.g. spatial awareness, motor control, growth of neuronal connections) degenerates first on the back end of life, especially when cells become metabolically exhausted through malabsorption of nutrients, stress, lack of certain nutritients, lack of movement, and compromised blood flow within capillaries.

You may visualize energy depletion of a cell, as I have illustrated in my lecture Visualizing Inflammation and the Energy Depleted State of Cells.

For the last 2 years I have presented seminars and taught my students how reversing cognitive decline is not only possible, but irrefutably does happen to brain cells, similar to how specific cells such as muscle cells require specific nutrients, rest for recovery, and proper dosage of stress/stimuli. (See week 9 in syllabus)

Consider to date: all monotherapies fail when it comes to treating and reversing cognitive decline because they do not address the conditions wholly and systemically that determine metabolism overall.

This introductory article Reversal of Cognitive Decline: A Novel Therapeutic Program, authored by Dale Bredesen of UCLA’s Department of Neurology, introduces what’s called ‘The Metabolic Model’. Others call this an energetic model.

As an exercise physiologist, I understand and provide solutions for people to heal their bodies.

Below (mobile webpage) is the entire syllabus to my class, Functional Exercise Physiology.


Syllabus 2018

Week 1. Glycogen Storage, Depletion, and Repletion

Week 1. Glycogen Storage, Depletion, and Repletion

Men and women store carbohydrates – renamed glycogen – primarily in muscles.

On a so-called normal carb diet (CHO diet) a woman stores almost 300g total glycogen in her body and a man stores 400g total.

The liver is like a spare gasoline tank for the body to store carbs; it stores approximately 50g glycogen in both men and women.

The main reason for storing glycogen in muscles is for when you exercise hard – your muscles cells have stored fuel on-site – so there is no delay to deliver fuel and sustain high intensity exercise.

HOW IS GLYCOGEN MADE IN THE BODY?

Week 2. Glycolysis Visualized

Week 2. Glycolysis Visualized

Can you sprint without breathing? Yes you can, but why? This question is aimed to provoke you to visualize exercise and nutrition as an active event - but more specifically, to see how a cell itself uses glucose anaerobically at any moment - at rest and during any...

Week 3. Fitness Lab – Lactate Testing

Week 3. Fitness Lab – Lactate Testing

1. Non-Traditional Lacate Testing:

Rather than perform a lactate test the traditional way – biking or running – we’ll test lactate through a variety of strength and resistance exercises, including classic Olympic weightlifting.

This provides a broader and more complete understanding of how different types of exercise use calories and fuel substrate. Get ready to have some fun testing this out!

Week 4. Sports Nutrition for Maximum Performance and Health.

Week 4. Sports Nutrition for Maximum Performance and Health.

When it comes to endurance training or ‘cardio’ training do you know the right intensity for increasing your client’s ability to run, bike, or row at the fastest speed that will not lead to exhaustion, overtraining, or injury?

The transition from ‘just the right dosage’ to ‘too much’ occurs very quickly over a very small increase of speed or intensity – and coincides with the need to eat either a lower or substantially greater carb intake.

Week 5. Nutrition Facts Labels and Conventional Dietary Structure: Perceptions and Ignorance

Week 5. Nutrition Facts Labels and Conventional Dietary Structure: Perceptions and Ignorance

This infographic serves as a perfect specimen to critique conventional dietary structure and the training nutritionists receive, and additionally serves for exploring peoples’ perception and inconsistencies – or I should say peoples’ consistency of rating certain foods more healthy (or less so) differently from one another.

To make this critique interesting, we’ll use the numbers from a Kind Bar’s Nutrition Facts to obtain the DRI for carbs, fat, and protein. This can be done using ANY product label.

Week 6. Protein for Regeneration of Muscle, Immune Function, and Healing

Week 6. Protein for Regeneration of Muscle, Immune Function, and Healing

Burn surgeons at Harvard once posted the nutritional regimen for promoting anabolic growth of muscles, which is critical for burn victims who must fend off infections and sometimes must regenerate lost muscle from burns before healing of wounds can occur!

This information is no longer available anywhere. The website no longer exists, not even in the internet archives. I only have it because I printed copies of it in 1996 and now have it as a PDF for students read.

Week 7. Pure Strength & Speed Training – The Science of Power

Week 7. Pure Strength & Speed Training – The Science of Power

Maximum Strength vs Max Contraction Speed

Classic power lifts do not maximize explosive ability because moving very heavy weight reduces contraction speed. Oppositely to power lifters, Usain Bolt maximizes his contraction speeds and velocity running, which requires about 30% of the force produced from the hamstrings in a 1-rep max squat or dead lift.

Week 8. Gut Physiology, Nutrient Malabsorption, Cognitive Decline, and More

Week 8. Gut Physiology, Nutrient Malabsorption, Cognitive Decline, and More

I am presenting the stage by stage progression of one thing: food itself – transforming within your mouth until it exits as poop. The advantage of doing this is explained in the capsule below titled, Why Focus Only on Food… Chronologically?

For those who are curious about what such a thing would look like, here’s a finished schematic related to the one created in this presentation.

Week 9. Prevention and Reversal of Structural Cognitive Decline

Week 9. Prevention and Reversal of Structural Cognitive Decline

Brain cells are like muscle cells; both share many of the same dependencies required for healthy function. You must rest them and provide specific nutrients to aid their recovery and promote function. Growth of the synaptic web is utterly different from concrete physical things which maintain cells’ metabolism and alters their structural and functional energetic state.

Sensory flow and experience create growth between neurons, i.e. integrates the neural network and increases associative understanding and parallel processing.

Week 10. Aerobic Metabolism Part 1

Week 10. Aerobic Metabolism Part 1

“How does a fetus breathe?” This is a trick question; I realize an embryo is not ‘lung breathing’. This is a challenge to think about how an embryo in the womb uses oxygen no differently as we all do once born into this world.

Week 11. Oxygen Powered Metabolism, VO2 Max, Speed and Performance

Week 11. Oxygen Powered Metabolism, VO2 Max, Speed and Performance

“Oxygen powered metabolism” pushed to the max begins to top off in the world’s fastest athletes at a speeds running near 13 mph in a marathon – and then maxes out around 15 mph in the 5k and 3k races. Oxygen based power in muscle cells cannot boost speeds past 15 mph. This tells us aerobic metabolism is a ‘weaker’ form of metabolism relative to anaerobic glycolysis.

Week 13. Metabolism of Mice and Men, Birds and Elephants

Week 13. Metabolism of Mice and Men, Birds and Elephants

Birds, mice, and other tiny mammals use much more O2 than humans do (adjusted for body weight).

This greater metabolic rate converts a greater proportion of “Total Energy Out” into “Wasted Heat” and is especially critical for surviving cold temperatures.

In order to sustain a very high rate of metabolic combustion and heat production compared to humans, birds must eat up to 17x or more the quantity of energy than a human, relatively. Despite eating so many calories, tiny animals do not gain mass because they dissipate heat extremely quickly.

This explains why a bird ‘going to bed’ on an empty stomach dies over a cold bitter night… lack of calories reduce heat production.

Conversely, the bodies of huge animals like elephants conserve heat because their size prevents rapid radiation of energy. Hence, the elephants huge ears serve as radiators to dissipate the heat.

Week 14. Visualizing Cardiac Output and Blood Flow Physics

Week 14. Visualizing Cardiac Output and Blood Flow Physics

When the left ventricle contracts it spins the blood into a whirlpool, creating a vacuum or low pressure vortex just before the aortic valve opens to let blood flow out to your body (imagine spinning wine in a wine glass). Read: Refutation of the Pressure-Propulsion Theory

The heart does not push blood into the aorta per se’. Again, spinning a fluid creates negative pressure, then by vacuum blood is sucked (ejected) into the aorta at a speed up to 1 m/s indicated by the red swirling lines – for the Healthy Volunteer only – in the 4D MRI video below.

Week 15. Your Brain on Collision Sports

Week 15. Your Brain on Collision Sports

To understand a concussion, we first compare it to a contusion in order to visualize microscopic and macroscopic damage done to the brain. We view brain cells, concussions, and contusions essentially the same way we viewed muscle cells within the metabolic model: A 3-D arrangement of cells/tissue – infused by capillaries where metabolism occurs: Fuel + O2 –> CO2 + H2O + Heat.

We conceive normal physiology as neurons working collectively and ‘lighting up’ dependent on your specific activity – within a crystalline-like electrical network, analogous to the Star Trek “energy forms in the sand”.

Week 16. Visualizing Inflammation and The Energy Depleted State of Cells

Week 16. Visualizing Inflammation and The Energy Depleted State of Cells

Calcium, excessive exercise/stress, and PUFA’s (polyunsaturated fatty acids) ruin metabolism and energy production by ‘over activating’ cells. Sodium enhances metabolism.

We’ll begin by looking at why ‘high’ salt intake (sodium) caused Russian cosmonauts to lose weight and NOT retain water despite the fact their caloric intake remained equivalent to a previous experiment eating a lower sodium diet.

Week 13. Metabolism of Mice and Men, Birds and Elephants

Birds, mice, and other tiny mammals use much more O2 than humans do (adjusted for body weight).

This greater metabolic rate converts a greater proportion of “Total Energy Out” into “Wasted Heat” and is especially critical for surviving cold temperatures.

In order to sustain a very high rate of metabolic combustion and heat production compared to humans, birds must eat up to 17x or more the quantity of energy than a human, relatively. Despite eating so many calories, tiny animals do not gain mass because they dissipate heat extremely quickly.

This explains why a bird ‘going to bed’ on an empty stomach dies over a cold bitter night… lack of calories reduce heat production.

Conversely, the bodies of huge animals like elephants conserve heat because their size prevents rapid radiation of energy. Hence, the elephants huge ears serve as radiators to dissipate the heat.

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