The Physical Rules

of Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Science

Exercise Physiologist Ed Watson

by Professor Edward Watson

Since 1992

  • Specialized Educational Materials
  • Seminars and Private Consulting

 

 

Nutritional Science and Human Performace Illustrated at the Cell Level

Syllabus

Week 1. Glycogen Storage, Depletion, and Repletion

Week 1. Glycogen Storage, Depletion, and Repletion

Men and women store carbohydrates – renamed glycogen – primarily in muscles.

On a so-called normal carb diet (CHO diet) a woman stores almost 300g total glycogen in her body and a man stores 400g total.

The liver is like a spare gasoline tank for the body to store carbs; it stores approximately 50g glycogen in both men and women.

The main reason for storing glycogen in muscles is for when you exercise hard – your muscles cells have stored fuel on-site – so there is no delay to deliver fuel and sustain high intensity exercise.

HOW IS GLYCOGEN MADE IN THE BODY?

WEEK 2. Glycolysis Visualized

WEEK 2. Glycolysis Visualized

Acid Production Graphed in MPH Instead of using the blue-yellow-red colored bar to indicate intensity, the graph below uses speeds ran by humans in mph - from rest up to running the world's fastest - 27.8 mph by Usain Bolt. The bold face type lists the world record...

Week 3. Fitness Lab – Lactate Testing

Week 3. Fitness Lab – Lactate Testing

The Physical Rules of Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Science Home   All lectures Meet in the Fitness Lab Read the two sections below and be prepared to: Workout and have your lactate tested. Record the measurements in your workbook for week 3. Rather than perform...

Week 10. Aerobic Metabolism Part 1

Week 10. Aerobic Metabolism Part 1

“How does a fetus breathe?” This is a trick question; I realize an embryo is not 'lung breathing'. This is a challenge to think about how an embryo in the womb uses oxygen no differently as we all do once born into this world. IMPORTANT!  Tap or click the image to...

Week 13. Metabolism of Mice and Men, Birds and Elephants

Week 13. Metabolism of Mice and Men, Birds and Elephants

Birds, mice, and other tiny mammals use much more O2 than humans do (adjusted for body weight).

This greater metabolic rate converts a greater proportion of “Total Energy Out” into “Wasted Heat” and is especially critical for surviving cold temperatures.

In order to sustain a very high rate of metabolic combustion and heat production compared to humans, birds must eat up to 17x or more the quantity of energy than a human, relatively. Despite eating so many calories, tiny animals do not gain mass because they dissipate heat extremely quickly.

This explains why a bird ‘going to bed’ on an empty stomach dies over a cold bitter night… lack of calories reduce heat production.

Conversely, the bodies of huge animals like elephants conserve heat because their size prevents rapid radiation of energy. Hence, the elephants huge ears serve as radiators to dissipate the heat.

Week 15. Your Brain on Collision Sports

Week 15. Your Brain on Collision Sports

Revisiting the Metabolic Model:   Flow of Energy, Blood, and Material. Spatial Sense of Anatomy and Holographic Storage of Information   ecture Overview: Main topic is concussions, but includes a discussion I had with a client last night...

Week 1: Glycogen Storage, Depletion and Repletion.

Week 1: Glycogen Storage, Depletion and Repletion.

On a so-called normal carb diet (CHO diet) a woman stores almost 300g total glycogen in her body and a man stores 400g total.

LIVER: The liver is like a spare gasoline tank for the body to store carbs; it stores approximately 50g glycogen in both men and women.

The main reason for storing glycogen in muscles is for when you exercise hard – your muscles cells have stored fuel on-site – so there is no delay to deliver fuel and sustain high intensity exercise.

HOW IS GLYCOGEN MADE IN THE BODY?

Week 13. Metabolism of Mice and Men, Birds and Elephants

Birds, mice, and other tiny mammals use much more O2 than humans do (adjusted for body weight).

This greater metabolic rate converts a greater proportion of “Total Energy Out” into “Wasted Heat” and is especially critical for surviving cold temperatures.

In order to sustain a very high rate of metabolic combustion and heat production compared to humans, birds must eat up to 17x or more the quantity of energy than a human, relatively. Despite eating so many calories, tiny animals do not gain mass because they dissipate heat extremely quickly.

This explains why a bird ‘going to bed’ on an empty stomach dies over a cold bitter night… lack of calories reduce heat production.

Conversely, the bodies of huge animals like elephants conserve heat because their size prevents rapid radiation of energy. Hence, the elephants huge ears serve as radiators to dissipate the heat.

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