Syllabus

Week 1: Glycogen Storage, Depletion and Repletion.

Week 1: Glycogen Storage, Depletion and Repletion.

On a so-called normal carb diet (CHO diet) a woman stores almost 300g total glycogen in her body and a man stores 400g total.

LIVER: The liver is like a spare gasoline tank for the body to store carbs; it stores approximately 50g glycogen in both men and women.

The main reason for storing glycogen in muscles is for when you exercise hard – your muscles cells have stored fuel on-site – so there is no delay to deliver fuel and sustain high intensity exercise.

HOW IS GLYCOGEN MADE IN THE BODY?

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Week 16: The Big Fat Lecture

Week 16: The Big Fat Lecture

Home How do you answer the following to your clients or friends? Why would adding saturated fats to a diet reduce inflammation?  Indicated by "if I get a flare up it's generally only a little spot between my index finger and thumb maybe the size of a dime." Hi Ed, I'm...

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Elite athletes who participate in endurance sports have a higher risk of heart rhythm problems than recreational athletes, a new Swedish study finds. And those who train for long periods also face an increased risk compared with those who train for less time.

“This study shows, that even though physical activity is generally healthy, athletes committed to endurance sports at elite level have higher risk of suffering from a heart rhythm disorder,” said study researcher Dr. Kasper Andersen, a cardiologist at Uppsala University in Sweden.

Earlier studies have reported a higher incidence of some heart rhythm disorders (or arrhythmias) among endurance sport athletes, but these studies have been small.

In the new study, Andersen and colleagues examined data from nearly 47,500 athletes who participated in a cross-country skiing race in Sweden between 1989 and 1998. The race, called the Vasaloppet, is 56 miles (90 kilometers) long and takes place in March each year. Participants range from elite skiers to recreational athletes, and their finishing time is closely related to how much they have trained, the researchers said.

The researchers compared each participant’s finishing time with the winning time that year, and counted the number of races completed by the participant (a measure of how long they had been training).

Compared with those who had completed the race once, those who had completed it seven or more times had 29 percent higher risk of developing a heart arrhythmia.

Further, elite athletes, who had finished the race within 1.6 times the winning time had a 37 percent higher risk of arrhythmias than recreational athletes , who finished in more than 2.4 times the winning time. This association was stronger among athletes less than 45 years old.

 

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